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THE FOUNDATION FOR CORPORATE SOCIAL RESPONSIBILITY IS A NETWORK OF INTERNATIONAL CORPORATIONS ACTIVELY WORKING IN POLAND TO AFFECT POSITIVE SOCIAL CHANGE THROUGH CORPORATE PHILANTHROPY. WE FEED, EDUCATE AND EMPOWER POOR CHILDREN IN POLAND. COLLECTIVELY, WE HAVE FED OVER 5 MILLION HOT MEALS TO SOME OF POLAND’S MOST NEEDY CHILDREN. OUR MISSION IS TO LEAD THE BUSINESS COMMUNITY IN RAISING THE LEVEL AND QUALITY OF CORPORATE SOCIAL RESPONSIBILITY.

May 14, 2012, Vol. 9, No. 18

"Long term success is built on credibility and on establishing enduring loving relationships with quality people based on mutually earned trust. Cut all ties with dishonest, negative or lazy people, and associate with people who share your values. You become who you associate with."
-- Dave Kekich

FOOD FOR THOUGHT

In 2010, Campbell Soup set a goal of "measurably improving the health of young people in hometown communities by reducing hunger and childhood obesity by 50%" by 2020. Two years in, the firm has made significant progress, and also has identified a number of challenges standing in the way. Read more about this in the firm’s upcoming 2012 CSR Report. CSRwire, May 11, 2012

IF YOU BELIEVE WHAT WE BELIEVE, YOU SHOULD JOIN US…

The Foundation for Corporate Social Responsibility is a network of international corporations actively working in Poland to affect positive social change through corporate philanthropy. We feed, educate, and empower poor children in Poland. Collectively, we have fed over 5 million hot meals to some of Poland’s most needy children. We provide Interactive English language training, music & dance instruction, educational travel opportunities, and a host of other educational experiences to 2,500 poor PromiseKids in 13 Polish schools. Our mission is to lead the business community in raising the level and quality of corporate social responsibility. We believe that:

Corporate Social Responsibility is the way in which business consistently creates shared value in society through economic development, good governance, stakeholder responsiveness and environmental improvement. Corporate Social Responsibility is an integrated, systemic approach by business that builds, rather than erodes or destroys, economic, social, human and natural capital.

A committed CEO is crucial to the sustainable success of an organization’s philanthropic initiatives.

A committed CEO has the ability to inspire employee participation in the corporate giving program, and by leading the company’s efforts, the CEO greatly enhances an organization’s credibility to customers and other stakeholders — strengthening public trust and the authenticity of the company’s Corporate Social Responsibility.

IF YOU BELIEVE WHAT WE BELIEVE…JOIN US… SEE HOW AT WWW.FCSR.PL WE ENCOURAGE OUR MEMBER CEOs TO INVITE LIKE THINKING CEOs TO ATTEND OUR ANNUAL MEETING AND CEO BREAKFAST AT THE INTERCONTINENTAL HOTEL ON SEPTEMBER 28, 2012.

SHOULD LARGE COMPANIES HELP ADDRESS SOCIETAL ISSUES? By Margaret Coady, Director, COMMITTEE ENCOURAGING CORPORATE PHILANTHROPY (CECP)

Should large companies help address societal issues? It's an age-old question that even today continues to be a subject of lively debate for the private sector. A company’s investors might advocate that the company leave progress on societal issues to government and nonprofits, opting for a bare-minimum scenario in which businesses do little more than pay taxes, obey the law, and pass all profits to shareholders.

But study after study – whether it’s the Annual Cone Survey or the Edelman Trust Barometer – shows that consumers are asking companies to do significantly more than the bare minimum. After all, a healthy company depends on a healthy society, so shouldn’t business step forward and get involved in a meaningful way.

Given the tension between consumer expectations and investor pressure, whose voice should corporate CEOs listen to?

This was the central theme of the Committee Encouraging Corporate Philanthropy’s (CECP) annual Board of Boards CEO conference.

Convened on the occasion of International Corporate Philanthropy Day, CECP brought together more than 50 leading global CEOs—including executive delegations from India and Brazil—to discuss the opposite tensions that a company’s consumers and investors exert on its commitment to community engagement. In this closed-door session, attendees focused on analyzing how CEOs can guide consumers and investors along the path of long-term societal well being.

The CEO Perspective on Social Responsibility

The results of our live polling made it clear that we had hit upon an acute area of tension for CEOs:

  • 59% of CEOs reported that consumers are demanding greater levels of transparency regarding a company’s community engagement initiatives as compared to five years ago.
  • 69% of CEOs felt their companies’ community engagement efforts are rewarded by consumers, yet most of those CEOs cannot concretely measure those rewards.
  • 52% of CEOs indicated that shareholder demand for transparency regarding a company’s commitment to community engagement is unchanged from five years ago.

Through panels and peer-to-peer discussions, the CEOs in attendance advocated for engaging more deeply in societal issues relevant to the future of the business.

Rather than fund causes reactively and sporadically, they said, companies can begin to satisfy consumer and investor pressures if they choose societal issues that are meaningful to those two groups simultaneously—issues that affect the company directly and for which the company has an opportunity to make a unique contribution. While many companies shared this ambition, the obvious hurdle: expert coordination between picking the issues and communicating activities to different audiences in a coherent, clear way.

A resounding suggestion from the attendees: Using social media as a channel for greater transparency about their commitment to community engagement.

In the second half of the conference, the CEOs examined an underlying measurement challenge. Despite their firsthand experience of the business benefits of taking an active role in helping address societal issues, companies are often unable to quantify those benefits.

President and CEO of Bloomberg L.P. Dan Doctoroff said: "We know that good companies tend to perform better, but until there's proof of that I don't think you're going to see a whole lot of interest from investors."

As the conversation progressed, however, there was consensus that while the financial benefits of a company’s community efforts often escapes accurate measurement, that shouldn’t be an excuse for companies to pull back or disengage.

In response to "In the marketplace, who will lead progress toward long-term societal well-being?" attending CEOs believed that the business community will be the agent for leading progress (45%) opposed to a collective call from consumers (32%), a regulatory intervention by government (18%), or investors recognizing and rewarding socially sustainable business practices (0%).

They saw a role for themselves to bring consumers and investors along on their companies' sustainability journey. They emphasized the need to be more accountable for taking action.

Western Union CEO Hikmet Ersek summed it up: “My hope is that every CEO steps up. I think we as CEOs must take greater responsibility. Leadership is the real issue and it starts at the top.”

Margaret Coady,
Director,
CECP

COKE IS ALWAYS THERE TO HELP OUR PROMISEKIDS

We just received word from Coca-Cola HBC Polska General Manager Ahmed Alafifi that Coke will be sending a shipment of Cappy juices to our PromiseKids as the end of the school draws near. Thanks Ahmed and thanks Coca-Cola HBC for this wonderful contribution. Our PromiseKids just love Cappy juices.

MOVE ONE TRUCK CARRYING BRITISH SCHOOL CLOTHING ARRIVES IN PROMISELAN

Thank you Foundation member Move One for transporting 63 boxes of clothing/shoes to the PromiseLand last week. The boxes contain clothing for babies, boys, girls, men and women. The clothing was collected by the British School Parent Teachers Association in Warsaw with the able support and assistance of the British Embassy and Makro Cash & Carry.

Our Meg and Basia have already selected the PromiseFamilies that will receive the clothing and shoes.

DATES TO REMEMBER

April 30-May 14th, 2012 – You Can Dance competition in the PromiseLand

June 11-15th – McDonald’s graduation trips for our Elementary School graduates to the Baltic.

June 8-June 30, EURO 2012 SoccerWorld, InterContinental Hotel. 100 PLN for the Foundation for each goal scored during the 24 game series. Make reservations at (22) 328 8772

June 18, 2012 – Completion of the 2011-2012 Interactive English Program “Dreams Come True”

June 29, 2012 – The end of the school year

August 10-12, 2012 – InterContinental Hotel Scholars Program in Warsaw

September – Foundation Advisory Council Meeting – Date to be announced.

September 28, 2012 - Foundation CEO Breakfast and Annual Meeting will be hosted by the InterContinental Hotel

February, 2013 – Ninth Annual Dinner Dance

THOUGHT FOR THE WEEK

"Children will not remember you for the material things you provided but for the feeling that you cherished them."

-- Richard L. Evans

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