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THE FOUNDATION FOR CORPORATE SOCIAL RESPONSIBILITY IS A NETWORK OF INTERNATIONAL CORPORATIONS ACTIVELY WORKING IN POLAND TO AFFECT POSITIVE SOCIAL CHANGE THROUGH CORPORATE PHILANTHROPY. WE FEED, EDUCATE AND EMPOWER POOR CHILDREN IN POLAND. COLLECTIVELY, WE HAVE FED OVER 5 MILLION HOT MEALS TO SOME OF POLAND’S MOST NEEDY CHILDREN. OUR MISSION IS TO LEAD THE BUSINESS COMMUNITY IN RAISING THE LEVEL AND QUALITY OF CORPORATE SOCIAL RESPONSIBILITY.

June 4, 2012, Vol. 9, No. 21

"Alone we can do so little; together we can do so much."
-- John Lennon

CSR FOOD FOR THOUGHT

"I founded the Fair Food Network (FFN) to guarantee access to healthy, fresh and sustainably grown food, especially in underserved communities. We work at the intersection of food systems, sustainability and social equity where our society, economy and environment are all at stake.

A “Fair Food” system should provide healthy, nutritious and safe food for everyone, grown in a manner that stewards the natural environment. Based on a more equitable distribution of resources, it should respect the wisdom of natural systems and produce a variety of crops and livestock, all grown in a manner that recycles the waste from one part of the system for use in another." ”

Raphael Bemporad,
Principal and Chief Strategy Officer, BBMG

YOU CAN DANCE IN THE PROMISELAND – WINNERS ANNOUNCED

You Can Dance in the PromiseLand was the brainchild of our own arts director, Barbara (Basia) Kolasinska and we are very proud of her special creativity. When we first started the Foundation for Corporate Social Responsibility, we knew that we needed to do more with the PromiseKids we were feeding. There was a major void in the arts curriculum in our PromiseLand schools, and our kids were missing out on a very important aspect of everyday modern life.

Our answer was to employ the very talented Basia Kolasinska to create an arts curriculum in our schools that would at least give our PromiseKids an exposure to the exceptional beauty of art, music and dance. Those of you who have attended our Annual Dinner Dances, have seen the results of her efforts first hand.

You Can Dance is a dance program carried on TV stations throughout the world. Boys and Girls from almost every background have gotten caught up in this incredible dance phenomenon. Basia asked the question, why not our PromiseKids? Being poor doesn’t mean our kids don’t have talent... True, none of our kids have had any private or formal dance training, and the financial expenditure for dance shoes, costumes, and music is out of the question for our PromiseLand schools. None of this stood in Basia’s way. With the help of our own Meg Cucha and Natalie Marciniak, they constructed a competitive You Can Dance program encompassing all 13 of our PromiseLand schools.

You Can Dance in the PromiseLand is a new foundation initiative to help promote dance as a daily part of an active, healthy lifestyle. Promisekids from all of our 13 schools were eligible to participate. The rules were the same as in the famous TV Show: You Can Dance. Talented dancers skilled in everything from Hip Hop, Krumping and Popping to Salsa, Quickstep and Jive competed to be named the PromiseLand's Best Dancers.

Those who were selected during the first auditions were given a pass and moved on to the next round. At the end of this process, a small number of dancers were chosen as 'finalists,' and moved on to compete in the final competition. where they will perform solo, duet and group dance numbers in a variety of dance styles.

The finals were held in the Lekowo School and we congratulate the following winners:


1st place solo dancer 0-3 graders Kaja Brzozowska Nowe Worowo


1st place team from Nowe Worowo


1st solo dancer Kinga Szewczyk Lekowo School


3rd place solo dancer Kacper Trojanowski Brzezno school

NOW, LET’S TAKE A LOOK AT THE POLISH NEWS

FOURTEEN PERCENT OF POLISH CHILDREN LIVE IN POVERTY

Fourteen percent of Polish children live in poverty, according to a recent UNICEF report. That figure places Poland in 25th place among 35 countries surveyed, according to Dziennik Gazeta Prawna, citing the UNICEF report.

A total of 13 million children across the EU live in poverty, the paper said.

POLISH EMIGRANTS TRANSFER LESS MONEY TO POLAND

When in 2007, over 2.2 million Polish citizens lived abroad money transfers from other countries to Poland reached a record level of zł.25 billion a year, which amounted to 2.5 percent of Poland's GDP. However, since then the transfer amount has been declining. Experts from Adam Smith's Center (CAS), who studied the influence of emigrants' transfers on the Polish economy, say the decline is, for the most part, the consequence of the financial crisis, which impacted the labor market affecting Polish emigrants especially in Great Britain and Ireland. As a result, in 2008 money transfers from abroad dropped to zł.20.6 billion. "The transfer dynamics have been falling due to people returning from emigration and families reuniting abroad," says Ireneusz Jabłoński, board member of CAS. In 2011, the value of transfers to Poland is estimated at zł.17 billion, which constitutes 1.42 percent of the GDP. Experts predict that the amount may remain the same in 2012. (Parkiet, p.9)

WAGES WON’T CATCH UP WITH PRICES THIS YEAR

Year 2012 may turn out to be the first in 20 years in which inflation ends up being higher than wage increases. This means that wages will have a lower purchasing power. The reason behind this is uncertainty on foreign markets, relatively high unemployment, increase in labor costs and high inflation. According to the Central Statistical Office (GUS), wages of close to 3 out of 5.5 million people working in large companies are losing their real value. Such is the situation in the pharmaceutical sectors, metal companies, retail, logistics and construction. GUS reports that in the first four months of this year wages increased by 4.5 percent, with inflation at 4.1 percent. "It is worth pointing out that the situation would be even worse if it wasn't for the minimum wage increase, which was of importance especially in case of industries where wages are low," says Piotr Soroczyński, economist. (Rzeczpospolita, p. 1; Parkiet, p. 10)

EXPERTS: HIGHER RETIREMENT AGE NECESSARY

Higher retirementIf Poland does not raise the retirement age the country will face serious demographic crisis, predict experts from consulting firm Deloitte. Other solutions like e.g. raising premiums, reducing benefits, increasing taxes are not possible on the current level of economic development or too costly. "Examples from other countries show that there is no universal way of dealing with the problem of the aging of the society. Additionally, adopting the solutions used in other countries may not bring expected results, because of a different economic situation Polish retirees are in as opposed to these in other countries, with the latter often having savings and investments," says Renata Onisk from Deloitte. (Parkiet, p. 10)

ECOLOGY IN WASTE MANAGEMENT

Poland's local governments will approve a new plan of waste segregation and recycling by the end of June, the daily Rzeczpospolita reported.

According to the plan PLN 6.5 billion will be invested in new installations and expansion of currently operating waste management plants by 2023, the daily wrote.

PARENTS OF YOUNG CHILDREN TO BENEFIT FROM NEW SOCIAL POLICIES

Poland's Labor Ministry wants to launch a program of subsidies in 2014 aimed at increasing employment among parents of young children, Rzeczpospolita daily writes.

Poland will offer subsidies to firms employing parents and also subsidize wages of parents who send their children to nurseries and return to work but not full-time, Deputy Labor Minister Jacek Mecina told the daily.

THIS IS WHAT THE CAUX ROUND TABLE HAS TO SAY ABOUT THE ECONOMY

The market economy in the West is facing a deepening crisis. Our free market system is drifting on the tides of fate without much of a leadership, ethical, or values rudder. Debt, materialism, and self-interest have increasingly dominated life in the West and financial intermediation and business have, in large part, become decoupled from long-term or societal value creation. As a result, the fabric of society is being seriously stressed, thereby bringing the sustainability of the soft, welfare state into question.

If our free market system is to survive and prosper, major reform and change is clearly needed. But, where will the needed leadership for change and reform come from?

Governments, multilateral bodies, and regulators clearly have a critical role to play, but more enlightened business leadership holds the real key. Will business leaders see the light and lead beyond their corporate walls in addressing the threats to the future of the free market system? Will business leaders rise to the challenge and deliver the new business models and behaviors necessary to chart a new paradigm for responsible enterprise and shared prosperity in the emerging, new world order?

DOLLAR REACHES LEVEL UNSEEN SINCE MARCH 2009

Yesterday at about 5 pm, one US dollar was worth zł.3.54, writes Dziennik Gazeta Prawna. The złoty hasn’t been so weak in relation to the American currency since March 2009. Analysts say the depreciation of the Polish currency has to do with growing risk aversion toward the eurozone. Spain is to blame this time as investors are afraid that the country won’t have sufficient funds to support its shaky banking system. (Dziennik Gazeta Prawna, p.4)

NO NEWSLETTER NEXT MONDAY

Virginia and I will travel to Seattle, Washington next weekend to attend the graduation of our daughter Katie from Seattle Pacific University. She will receive a Bachelor of Arts Degree in Communications.

Some of our longer-term foundation members and school principals will recall that Katie helped me get the Foundation for Corporate Social Responsibility off the ground almost 10 years ago.

We are very proud of her achievement and look forward to spending this special time with her in Seattle.

The newsletter will return as usual on June 18th.

DATES TO REMEMBER

June 8-June 30, EURO 2012 SoccerWorld, InterContinental Hotel. 100 PLN for the Foundation for each goal scored during the 24 game series. Make reservations at (22) 328 8772

June 11 – 15 - McDonald’s Trip to the Baltic for our 6th grade PromiseKids

June 18, 2012 – Completion of the 2011-2012 Interactive English Program “Dreams Come True”

June 29, 2012 – The end of the school year

August 10-12, 2012 – InterContinental Hotel Scholars Program in Warsaw

September 28, 2012 - Foundation CEO Breakfast and Annual Meeting will be hosted by the InterContinental Hotel

September 29, 2012 – Netherlands - Polish Chamber of Commerce Rijsttafel Ball to benefit our PromiseKids. Hilton Hotel, 18:00 – 23:00

October 2, 2012 – Foundation’s Advisory Council Meeting, InterContinental Hotel

February, 2013 – Ninth Annual Dinner Dance

THOUGHT FOR THE WEEK

"What we perceive as a failure may simply be our inner being's way of telling us that we are ready to move to a new level of growth."

- Anne Wilson Schaef

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