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THE FOUNDATION FOR CORPORATE SOCIAL RESPONSIBILITY IS A NETWORK OF INTERNATIONAL CORPORATIONS ACTIVELY WORKING IN POLAND TO AFFECT POSITIVE SOCIAL CHANGE THROUGH CORPORATE PHILANTHROPY. WE FEED, EDUCATE AND EMPOWER POOR CHILDREN IN POLAND. COLLECTIVELY, WE HAVE FED OVER 5 MILLION HOT MEALS TO SOME OF POLAND’S MOST NEEDY CHILDREN. OUR MISSION IS TO LEAD THE BUSINESS COMMUNITY IN RAISING THE LEVEL AND QUALITY OF CORPORATE SOCIAL RESPONSIBILITY.

November 18, 2013 Vol. 10, No.35

"Heart has its reasons, which reason does not know. We feel it in a thousand things."
-- Blaise Pascal

1% INCOME TAX PROGRAM TO BEGIN

It’s that time of year again. Our foundation is certified as a Public Benefit Organization (OPP) under Polish Tax Law. The Public Benefit and Volunteer Work Act permits our member companies, their employees and other tax payers, to donate 1% of their income tax to our Foundation. This money will be used to support our work in feeding, educating and empowering poor children in Poland.

The Public Benefit Act is based on the premise that instead of paying the Revenue Officer, you can support a public benefit cause like feeding our PromiseKids. Ask your accountant how you can donate your 1%.

FOREIGN STUDENTS IN POLAND

There are 29,172 foreign students from 142 countries reading at Polish universities, 4,000 more than in 2012 (up 17%), a report commissioned by The Perspectives Educational Foundation said.

Most of them (10,000) came from Ukraine.

The number of foreign students has been on the rise since six years ago when their numbers accounted for 0.6% of overall student numbers. In 2013 the number rose to barely 1.74 percent of all students.

MOST CONSUMERS WHO BUY CHARITY-LINKED PRODUCTS WANT RESULTS

The Chronicle of Philanthropy reported a new study that takes a look at Charity-Linked buying habits.

Most people who buy products that raise money for charity are no longer just looking at the label to see how much they’d be giving to what cause. Instead, they’re increasingly searching for information on how much of a difference their past purchases have made to the charity, a new study finds.

While 54 percent of people have bought a product that benefited a charity in the past 12 months, up from 41 percent in 2010, only a fourth believe they have made a significant difference buying products that support causes, according to the online survey of 1,270 adults by Cone Communications, a company that helps charities and business shape marketing deals.

Consumers also don’t know whether the companies that are providing these products are doing that much good. The study says only 16 percent of those surveyed believe that companies have made a significant difference by selling charity-related products.

“Companies (and nonprofits) really need to do a better job of articulating the impact they’re having,” says Alison DaSilva, Cone executive vice president for research and insights. “The flag has been raised.” She says nonprofits need to be able to show consumers the programs that have benefited from the purchases and share that with companies. “Nonprofits, they are in the front lines,” Ms. DaSilva says. “They can create that content that companies can then distribute.”

The study says the top way people want to learn more about results is from the product’s packaging or label (21 percent); a story in the news media (16 percent); or a print, broadcast or online advertisement (16 percent).

Among the other findings:

  • Eighty-nine percent of consumers were likely to switch brands to one associated with a cause if the price and quality were the same. That’s up from 80 percent in 2010, the last time the survey was conducted.
  • Forty-two percent have boycotted a company’s products or services in the past year after learning it had behaved in a way deemed irresponsible.
  • If given the opportunity, 79 percent of adults would donate to a charity supported by a company they trust.
  • Economic development is the biggest issue consumers hope companies will try to solve through their charitable work, with 44 percent voting it as their top choice. Efforts to fight poverty and hunger were the next most popular cause, cited by 14 percent, followed by environmental causes, at 13 percent.

HOW ARE CHARITIES DOING IN AMERICA? WHAT CAN WE TAKE FROM THE FOLLOWING RESULTS?

As America’s economy seesaws, the biggest nonprofits are barely able to make up the fundraising losses they sustained in the Great Recession. Donations to groups in the Philanthropy 400, the charities that raise the most in America, grew just 4 percent last year, slightly more than half the gain in 2011. And the forecast from 88 groups that provided estimates for 2013 is even grimmer: It shows a projected decrease of 1 percent.

A tally by The Chronicle of Philanthropy shows how unevenly the gains are spread even among the 400 groups that together raise $1 of out every $4 in America. Only about half of the charities on the Philanthropy 400 are raising more than they did in 2007, when the recession started. Among the biggest recovery stories since the recession are organizations that create charitable funds for donors and those that depend on America’s wealthiest philanthropists.

This year, gifts of $1-million or more are booming; in early October, such commitments stood at twice the level they were by the same point in 2012. Many more traditional charities, however, which rely on a broad pool of donations from Americans at all income levels, continue struggling to win support.

And the still-uncertain economy and fears of a return to recession next year threaten to make it even trickier for nonprofits to raise money in the crucial year-end season. Even so, fundraising by the largest organizations is outperforming the rest of the nonprofit world: In June, “Giving USA” reported that donations rose only 1.5 percent in 2012 after inflation. A sign of the struggle: The No. 1 organization, United Way Worldwide, is treading water. The organization raised $3.9-billion in 2012, less than a 1-percent gain over 2011. Since 2007, its private donations dropped by more than 16 percent.

“Where we are the case of so many nonprofits: We have not returned to pre-recession levels,” says Sherrie Brach, executive vice president for investor relations at United Way Worldwide. “I think the whole sector is trying to regain lost ground, and we are one of those organizations.”

Hot on United Way’s heels is Fidelity Charitable, at No. 2 for the second year in a row. The organization, which promotes donor-advised funds, collected $3.3-billion in 2012, a gain of more than 89 percent over the previous year.

Other organizations that offer donor-advised funds are also doing well. Of the 20 groups whose donations grew by the largest percentages from 2007 to 2012, five were community foundations, businesses, or others that offer the funds, which allow donors to get immediate tax benefits no matter when they give the money to charity...

The list’s biggest one-year gains were logged by the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art. Last year it didn’t make the list at all; this year it is No. 122, after raising $181-million in 2012, an increase of more than 400 percent from 2011. The donations were fueled by a campaign started in 2009 to expand the museum, which met its goal of $555-million three years ahead of schedule and is now aiming to bring in $610-million.

After United Way and Fidelity Charitable, No 3. on the list was the Salvation Army, followed by Task Force for Global Health, Feeding America, Catholic Charities USA, Stanford University, Silicon Valley Community Foundation, Goodwill Industries International, and Food for the Poor.

HERE IS HOW YOU CAN HELP OUR PROMISEKIDS

Our Dollar a Day program may be just what you have been looking for and the PayPal method of delivering your money makes it so easy. We pay just about $1.00 to feed one hungry Polish child a hot-meal per school day, $20.00 per month, $200.00 per year. Click PayPal below to contribute.

DATES TO REMEMBER

November 28th – Last day of gift collections for the British School’s, Christmas Giving Tree for our PromiseKids.

December 9-22nd – Makro Cash & Carry Christmas Campaign.

February 3, 2014 - Foundation’s Annual Dinner Dance Sponsored by the Warsaw Hotel and Convention Center. Things get underway at 18:30. Make your table reservations now!

THOUGHT FOR THE WEEK

"If you have men who will only come if they know there is a good road, I don't want them. I want men who will come if there is no road at all."

-- David Livingstone

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