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THE FOUNDATION FOR CORPORATE SOCIAL RESPONSIBILITY IS A NETWORK OF INTERNATIONAL CORPORATIONS ACTIVELY WORKING IN POLAND TO AFFECT POSITIVE SOCIAL CHANGE THROUGH CORPORATE PHILANTHROPY. WE FEED, EDUCATE AND EMPOWER POOR CHILDREN IN POLAND. COLLECTIVELY, WE HAVE FED OVER 6 MILLION HOT MEALS TO SOME OF POLAND’S MOST NEEDY CHILDREN. OUR MISSION IS TO LEAD THE BUSINESS COMMUNITY IN RAISING THE LEVEL AND QUALITY OF CORPORATE SOCIAL RESPONSIBILITY.

January 13, 2014 Vol. 11, No.2

"When something bad happens you have three choices. You can let it define you, let it destroy you, or you can let it strengthen you."
-- Author Unknown

HAVE YOU MADE YOUR RESERVATIONS FOR OUR 11TH ANNUAL DINNER DANCE ON FEBRUARY 3RD?

Our PromiseKids are back in school and abuzz with final rehearsals, costume fittings, last minute adjustments and excitement galore as they prepare for our 11th Annual Dinner Dance at the Hilton Warsaw Hotel and Convention Center on February 3, 2014 at 18:30, The PromiseKids can’t wait to dazzle you with their dancing, singing skills, and their infectious energy!

The Hilton Staff is busy planning a delectable menu, designing the ballroom and polishing up the dance floor for our guests. The “best band in the land”, 36.6 is ready to go, and Pablo is preparing another touching DVD, capturing the highlights of the Foundation’s activities over the past ten years.

We are selling tables quickly, so if you haven’t done it yet, get your table reservations and payments in to Natalie ASAP! You don’t want to miss this incredible celebration.

As in previous years, we don’t issue tickets. We ask that table holders submit a list of their guests so we can easily identify them at the door. Ours is not a “Black Tie” event, and business casual attire will be just perfect for the occasion. The price of a table for 10 guests (2,400 PLN) is all inclusive of beer, wine, 5-star Hilton dinner, and a star-studded production of Hollywood’s greatest music. Individual tickets sell for 240 PLN each.

Cocktails begin at 18:30 and the dance music ends at 23:00.

RECOVERY EXPECTED ON POLAND’S LABOR MARKET THIS YEAR

Poland ended 2013 with registered unemployment rate at 13.4%, up by 0.2 pps from 13.2% at the end of November and below 13.8% written in the 2013 budget, the Labor Ministry said on Thursday.

The number of registered unemployed at the end of December measured 2.158 million, the ministry said.

The number of unemployed increased by 78,700, the lowest monthly rise at this time of the year since 2007, Labor Minister Wladyslaw Kosiniak-Kamysz cited in his statement.

"The December increase (November) was decisively weaker than last year," Kosiniak-Kamysz said. "This gives hope that the worst on the labor market is over and the recovery expected for months is coming."

In December, employers filed 46,000 job offers to state job agencies, up 28% y/y.

In its 2013 budget Poland expected to end 2013 with a 13.8% jobless rate.

POLISH SOCIETY AGING FAST

In 2060, over a third (34.5 percent) of Poles will be aged 65 or more, according to forecasts from Eurostat. No other EU country bar Latvia, will have as many senior citizens. In the past 25 years, the number of children under the age of 15 has dropped by an astounding 40 percent to 5.8 million. At the same time, the number of Polish citizens aged 65 and over has risen by over 50 percent to 5.6 million. This means that a decreasing number of workers are going to be maintaining an increasing number of pensioners. This will bring with it the risk of a revolution and cause a wave of emigration, said Krystyna Iglicka-Ok.lska, a demography expert at the Lazarski University. We could have young workers protesting because their real incomes will be low and they could be joined by the pensioners who will have low pensions and even employers who will likely have to pay high taxes and will thus have meager profits, she added. In order to balance the equation, Poland would have to import at least 5 million immigrants by 2050. But we would have to compete with richer western countries for these immigrants and besides Poland would stop being an ethnically homogenous society then. Poles are not ready for this, Ms Iglicka-Ok.lska said.

SIX DISTINCT TYPES OF SOCIAL CHANGE AGENTS AROUND THE WORLD

Positive social change occurs when individuals strongly believe they have the power to make a difference—and they take action. On average, 92% of adults say they have done something to engage in positive social change at some point in their lives. But who are these people creating and contributing to positive social change? As revealed in Walden University’s 2013 Social Change Impact Report, released in December, there are six distinct types of social change agents around the world: Ultra-committed Change-Makers, Faith-Inspired Givers, Socially Conscious Consumers, Purposeful Participants, Casual Contributors and Social Change Spectators. Each type of social change agent is unique in terms of engagement levels, motivating factors and issues of importance.

Commissioned by Walden University and conducted online by Harris Interactive in April–May 2013, the third annual survey includes perspectives of more than 9,000 adults in Brazil, Canada, China, Germany, India, Jordan, Mexico and the United States. A continuation of the 2011 and 2012 social change impact reports about the state of social change around the world, the 2013 study was designed to discover more about people who are involved in positive social change, ultimately putting a face on social change agents. Everyone has the power to make a difference, whether big or small or local or global. Our study has now identified the different kinds of individuals who are doing important work around the world,” says Dr. Cynthia Baum, president of Walden University. “By segmenting these groups in the 2013 survey, we find new insights to understanding the ways in which social change agents are alike and different.”

Ultra-committed Change-Makers

True to the name, Ultra-committed Change-Makers have been known to dedicate their lives to leading positive social change. They may be interested in many different causes, believe strongly in their ability to make a real difference in their communities and feel happy as a result of their involvement. Plugged into technology, these Change-Makers often can be found initiating conversations about social change to others online and feel social change should be taught at a young age. When growing up, many in this profile probably had parents who were active in social change. As adults, many members of this segment now engage in a social change activity at least once a month. Compared with social change agents overall:

  • Most say it is very important to them personally to be involved in positive social change (71%, on average, of Ultra-committed Change-Makers vs. 39%, on average, of social change agents overall).
  • Nearly half do something to engage in positive social change at least once a month (46%, on average vs. 30%, on average).
  • Most say they engage in positive social change because it is a lifelong commitment (74%, on average, say this describes them completely or very well vs. 45%, on average).
  • They want to make a difference in people’s lives because others have made a difference in theirs (92%, on average vs. 74%, on average).

Faith-Inspired Givers

Religion is a driving force behind Faith-Inspired Givers who cite their faith, not work or school, as a major influence in their commitment to social change. Many sharing this profile tend to be older than other social change agents and tend to be less likely to connect online. Like many others, Faith-Inspired Givers’ parents participated in social change when they were growing up, and now they want to set an example for their own children. They may feel blessed in their lives and want to give back to their community, attend a religious service regularly and feel a moral obligation to participate in social change. Compared with social change agents overall:

  • Three-quarters say they engage in positive social change because it is part of their faith or religious beliefs (75%, on average, of Faith-Inspired Givers say this describes them completely or very well vs. 39%, on average, of social change agents overall).
  • Nine in 10 attend a religious service at least once a month (92%, on average vs. 35%, on average).
  • Faith-Inspired Givers are less motivated by websites (23%, on average vs. 47%, on average).

Socially Conscious Consumers

Supporting others who support social change, Socially Conscious Consumers often seek out products and services from companies they perceive as behaving responsibly toward the people and the environment in the communities where they operate. These social change agents tend to be influenced by a sense of social justice and drawn to the environment or “green” issues. You can often find this group connecting online, educating others about causes both local and global. For many, social change can be a lifelong commitment. Compared with social change agents overall:

  • Nine in 10 report that when purchasing a product or service, they make an effort to choose a company that behaves responsibly toward the people and environment in the communities where it operates (91%, on average, of Socially Conscious Consumers vs. 82%, on average, of social change agents overall).
  • Eight in 10 say that social justice (e.g., anti-discrimination, tolerance, civil rights, etc.) is among the social change topics that are most important to them (81%, on average vs. 71% on average).
  • Three-quarters say that the environment and “green” issues (e.g., global warming, climate change, pollution, etc.) are among the social change topics that are most important to them (76%, on average vs. 60%, on average).

Purposeful Participants

While other social change agents may be motivated by personal beliefs, Purposeful Participants tend to engage in social change primarily to help them succeed at school or work. Perhaps more pragmatic in nature, many place less importance on being personally involved in social change and are less likely to donate money or services. Among social change agents, Purposeful Participants tend to report the highest levels of personal sacrifice or risk in pursuing social change.

Compared with social change agents overall:

  • Six in 10 say it was important for applying to enter a college or university (58%, on average, of Purposeful Participants vs. 29%, on average, of social change agents overall), it was to fulfill a requirement for a class, school or education program (63%, on average vs. 33%, on average) or their employer or job encouraged it (60%, on average vs. 37%, on average).
  • Two-thirds say it was important for their resume or applying for a job (65%, on average vs. 31%, on average).
  • More than half have had relationships with friends or family suffer because of their beliefs about positive social change (52%, on average vs. 31%, on average).
  • More than half have given up spending more time with their family in order to be involved in positive social change (56%, on average vs. 37%, on average).

Casual Contributors

For Casual Contributors, local community issues are most likely to drive their social change activities. While they see social change as important, this group probably is not likely to make it a lifelong commitment or typically act on it. Many are older adults without children and often are not influenced by work or religious beliefs. Compared with social change agents overall:

  • About one-quarter say it is very important to them personally to be involved in positive social change (27%, on average, of Casual Contributors vs. 39%, on average, of social change agents overall).
  • About one-quarter do something to engage in positive social change at least once a month (24%, on average vs. 30%, on average).
  • Casual Contributors are less likely to have participated in positive social change because they were motivated by something that they learned about on a website other than a social networking site (27%, on average vs. 47%, on average) and because it was important for their resume or applying for a job (9%, on average vs. 31%, on average).

Social Change Spectators

While Social Change Spectators have engaged in social change at some point, they may not be active participants. In general, they do not see their actions as impacting positive change in their community and had little experience with participating in social change in their youth. Typically Social Change Spectators do not believe it is important to be personally involved in social change—whether in person or online. Compared with social change agents overall:

  • Hardly any say it is very important to them personally to be involved in positive social change (4%, on average, of Social Change Spectators vs. 39%, on average, of social change agents overall).
  • About one in 10 do something to engage in positive social change at least once a month (9%, on average vs. 30%, on average).
  • Very few say they engage in positive social change because it is a lifelong commitment (6%, on average, say this describes them completely or very well vs. 45%, on average).
  • Social Change Spectators are less likely than other social change agents overall to have participated in positive social change activities or volunteered when they were in high school (46%, on average vs. 74%, on average).

Furthermore, in each country a segment of the population says it never engages in positive social change.

In addition to establishing these profiles, the 2013 survey also found that participation in social change has maintained its importance, is widespread and is moving forward as a result of people working together to address the issues most important to them. What’s more, findings reveal that education continues to play a vital role in providing opportunities for social change engagement, which, if modeled to children and started at a young age, may lead to more involvement in adulthood.

For more detailed findings from Walden’s Social Change Impact Report, visit www.WaldenU.edu/impactreport.

EUROSTAT: POLISH GDP PER CAPITA AT 67% OF EU AVERAGE

Poland's gross domestic product per capita measured in purchasing power standards stood at 67 percent of the EU average in 2012, compared to 65 percent in 2011 and 63 percent in 2010. The GDP per capita figure was the highest in Luxembourg, Eurostat said, where it stood for 263 percent of the EU average. The figures for other countries were much lower, with Austria's GDP per capita second highest at 130 percent of the average. Actual individual consumption per capita in Poland was at 73 percent of the EU average in Poland, Eurostat also said.

HERE IS HOW YOU CAN HELP OUR PROMISEKIDS

Our Dollar a Day program may be just what you have been looking for and the PayPal method of delivering your money makes it so easy. We pay just about $1.00 to feed one hungry Polish child a hot-meal per school day, $20.00 per month, $200.00 per year. Click PayPal below to contribute.

DATES TO REMEMBER

February 3, 2014 - Foundation’s Annual Dinner Dance Sponsored by the Warsaw Hilton Hotel and Convention Center. Things get underway at 18:30. Make your table reservations now!

THOUGHT FOR THE WEEK

"The last of the human freedoms is to choose one's attitudes."

-- Viktor Frankl

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