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THE FOUNDATION FOR CORPORATE SOCIAL RESPONSIBILITY IS A NETWORK OF INTERNATIONAL CORPORATIONS ACTIVELY WORKING IN POLAND TO AFFECT POSITIVE SOCIAL CHANGE THROUGH CORPORATE PHILANTHROPY. WE FEED, EDUCATE AND EMPOWER POOR CHILDREN IN POLAND. COLLECTIVELY, WE HAVE FED OVER 6 MILLION HOT MEALS TO SOME OF POLAND’S MOST NEEDY CHILDREN. OUR MISSION IS TO LEAD THE BUSINESS COMMUNITY IN RAISING THE LEVEL AND QUALITY OF CORPORATE SOCIAL RESPONSIBILITY.

February 17, 2014 Vol. 11, No.7

"There are only two ways to live your life. One is as though nothing is a miracle. The other is as if everything is."
-- Albert Einstein

WE WELCOME C.H. ROBINSON WORLDWIDE AS A NEW FOUNDATION MEMBER

It is with great pleasure that we welcome C.H. Robinson Worldwide (Poland), as a new Foundation Member. We were honored to present C.H. Robinson with our Gold Seal of Approva as a Socially Responsible Company at our Foundation’s 11th Annual Dinner Dance last week.

The C.H. Robinson retail distribution team provides full outsource distribution services to key retail customers, providing outbound transport management from various distributions centers directly to stores across Poland. The expectation is that they will expand their services in the Central European region. The C.H. Robinson central office is responsible for managing all customer operations for key customers throughout Poland with a strong focus on strategic growth and service expansion across Central Europe.

C.H. Robinson Worldwide, Inc. is a Fortune 500 company offering third-party logistics. The company offers transportation and logistics services such as freight transportation, transportation management, customs brokerage, and warehousing. It offers logistics solutions by truckload, less than truckload, intermodal, ocean, and air freight transportation.

The company is headquartered in Eden Prairie, Minnesota, USA, with 285 offices in Europe, Asia, South America, and Australia. The company has contractual relationships with over 56,000 transportation companies, including motor carriers, railroads, air freight, and ocean carriers. C. H. Robinson also engages in buying, selling, and marketing fresh produce It offers its fresh produce to grocery retailers, restaurants, produce wholesalers, and foodservice distributors through a network of independent produce growers and suppliers.

Founded in 1905, C.H. Robinson is consistently ranked by Fortune Magazine and CNN as one of the world’s Most Admired Companies in Trucking, Transportation and Logistics from 2010-2013. C.H. Robinson was ranked the top 3PL firm by Inbound Logistics. In 2012, the firm was the most profitable tier-one 3PL and regularly achieved net income margins greater than 20%. It posted $11.4 billion in net revenue that year. The company was named the No. 1 Large Company in the 2013 Best Places to Work ranking by the Minneapolis/St. Paul Business Journal.

Please join us in welcoming C.H. Robinson (Poland) as a new Foundation Member and congratulate them for being a world-class Socially Responsible Company.

WE WELCOME C.H. ROBINSON WORLDWIDE AS A NEW FOUNDATION MEMBER

Beyond Demographics: The New Responsible Consumer Profile

Too often as marketers we try to tailor our strategies based on demographics. Yet, when it comes to engaging consumers around CSR, the approach is not as straightforward. Individuals of all different ages and backgrounds have varying levels of support for companies’ CSR efforts – but we see them come together around a shared belief regarding their personal roles in addressing social and environmental issues through their purchases. To better understand consumer motives and behaviors, Cone Communications segmented their 2013 Cone Communications/Echo Global CSR Study with the primary filter of personal responsibility. The data revealed four distinct profiles, each demanding different approaches to marketing communications and engagement. Below they explore each profile and its unique drivers, including how consumers believe companies should address CSR issues, what role they feel they play in making purchases and how they want to receive information.

The Old Guard

Likely to be male and over the age of 55, Old Guards do not think their personal purchases play a role in CSR. Their decision-making hinges on traditional values of price, quality and convenience. If they do purchase responsible products, 32 percent say it’s merely by chance. In fact, only one-third (36%) believes their purchases can actually have an impact on social or environmental issues – and more than half (53%) feel companies have minimal or no impact at all.

Supporting Data:

  • 41% have bought a CSR product in the past 12 months and 31% say they are very likely to switch brands to one that is associated with a cause
  • Top motives if buying CSR-associated products include: improving their own lives (25%) or being consistent with their values (23%)

The Old Guards want to know what companies are doing, but they are not likely to deeply engage. To resonate with this group, companies should keep their CSR messages and activations simple, personal and traditional.

The Happy-Go-Lucky

The Happy-Go-Lucky – typically between the ages of 18 and 34 and equally likely to be male or female – enjoy knowing they can impact social and environmental issues through their purchases, but doing so doesn’t drive their decisions. Convenience is king, as the Happy-Go-Lucky believe their role is to buy responsibly only if the opportunity presents itself. And although they are optimistic about their ability to positively influence pressing issues through purchasing (72%), it’s not just about doing good; they also need to feel good. Thirty-one percent says “making me feel good” is the primary benefit sought from purchasing responsibly.

Supporting Data:

  • 93% says they would buy products with social and/or environmental benefits, but just two-thirds have actually done so
  • 67% says businesses are positively impacting issues
  • 62% say they engage with companies via social media and are especially likely to share positive information about companies’ CSR efforts with people in their networks (31%)

Companies can win Happy-Go-Lucky’s loyalty by incentivizing CSR purchasing with a dual benefit and communicating the impacts of their personal efforts. Tap this group’s high aspirations to get involved with a simple call-to-action beyond purchasing.

The Bleeding Heart

The Bleeding Heart – typically female between ages 18 and 34 – is an educated person who goes out of their way to try to save the world with every trip to the store, even though they are unsure of the ultimate impact. The number one benefit Bleeding Hearts seek from responsibly made products is to positively impact society. Yet nearly a third (29 percent) believes they themselves have little to no positive impact, and 38 percent thinks businesses have made equally mediocre progress. Although their hearts may ache for social and environmental problems, the Bleeding Heart does not buy unthinkingly, and more than half (57%) have boycotted products or services they find negligent.

Supporting Data:

  • 69% has bought a product with a social or environmental benefit in the past 12 months, and 93% will switch brands to one associated with a cause when price and quality are equal
  • Want companies to provide opportunities to donate (80%) and volunteer (78%)
  • 64% uses social media to address social and environmental issues

Engagement beyond purchase and communication of societal benefits will be key differentiators for companies to attract Bleeding Hearts. It is also important to leverage a myriad of communication channels as digital savvy group will share both positive and negative information.

The Ringleader

The Ringleaders are typically men and women ages 35+ who aggressively address social and environmental issues, not only through their own consumption, but by rallying others to follow their lead. They go the extra mile to encourage others to purchase responsibly because they strongly believe they can have a significant (45%) impact on issues. Eighty-one percent has purchased responsible products in the past 12 months, and nearly all (92%) have taken CSR into account when deciding which products to recommend to their friends. Perhaps most impressive, 71 percent is very likely to switch brands to ensure they’re purchasing to support a cause. That’s a staggering 50 percent more likely than the Bleeding Hearts (71% vs. 48%).

Supporting Data:

  • 95% wants to hear how companies are operating responsibly and won’t be shy about voicing their own opinions (91%)
  • 47% has researched companies’ business practices in the past 12 months
  • 44% believes business should change the way they operate and 38% advocate in support of issues – holding businesses to the highest standards of all the consumer segments

Ringleaders hold companies to the highest CSR standards, so consistent and transparent proof of purpose will be critical to gaining their support. Companies should also continuously offer new and fresh opportunities for engagement as this group stands ready, willing and able to advocate on a company’s behalf to their social networks.

Understanding consumers’ personal responsibility at purchase is just the beginning – companies can use this information to create custom marketing messages for each segment but also build a spectrum of engagement levels to fit each profile’s individual preferences and passion points. To learn more about the Old Guard, Happy-Go-Lucky, Bleeding Heart and Ringleader, download a free copy of the 2013 Cone Communications/Echo Global CSR Study.

FOOD FOR THOUGHT ABOUT CSR

Corporate responsibility isn't making decisions only when there's an obvious business yield from doing good. It's about making a long-term bet that building an ethical company filled with empathetic employees will boost performance and engagement, and will create a company that customers and shareholders trust to stand by its principles and will remain loyal to, even if it costs in the short-term.

POLAND’S POPULATION SMALLER IN 2013

Poland’s population declined by about 37,000 year-on-year in 2013, statistics office GUS said in an announcement on Thursday. This was the second consecutive year of a decline in population, GUS said. The demographic situation is difficult and there are no positive changes ahead at the moment. A low fertility rate combined with a growing life expectancy will result in a decline of labor force and an acceleration of the aging process of the Polish society, GUS also said.

POLAND STILL WAITING FOR BABY BOOM

The Polish government's decision to prolong paid maternity leaves to one year has failed to bring effects in terms of increased number of childbirths. The daily Puls Biznesu reported the recent data of the Central Statistical Office (GUS). The reform has was reported in July 2013.

According to GUS, some 162,000 babies were born between July and November 2013, resulting in 3% fewer births than in 2012 and 7% fewer than in the same period of 2011.

1%

HERE IS HOW YOU CAN HELP OUR PROMISEKIDS

Our Dollar a Day program may be just what you have been looking for and the PayPal method of delivering your money makes it so easy. We pay just about $1.00 to feed one hungry Polish child a hot-meal per school day, $20.00 per month, $200.00 per year. Click PayPal below to contribute.

DATES TO REMEMBER

April 17-22, 2014 - Spring Break

June 27, 2014 - End of school year

THOUGHT FOR THE WEEK

"If you're climbing the ladder of life, you go rung by rung, one step at a time. Don't look too far up, set your goals high but take one step at a time. Sometimes you don't think you're progressing until you step back and see how high you've really gone."

-- Donny Osmond

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