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THE FOUNDATION FOR CORPORATE SOCIAL RESPONSIBILITY IS A NETWORK OF INTERNATIONAL CORPORATIONS ACTIVELY WORKING IN POLAND TO AFFECT POSITIVE SOCIAL CHANGE THROUGH CORPORATE PHILANTHROPY. WE FEED, EDUCATE AND EMPOWER POOR CHILDREN IN POLAND. COLLECTIVELY, WE HAVE FED OVER 7 MILLION HOT MEALS TO SOME OF POLAND’S MOST NEEDY CHILDREN. OUR MISSION IS TO LEAD THE BUSINESS COMMUNITY IN RAISING THE LEVEL AND QUALITY OF CORPORATE SOCIAL RESPONSIBILITY.

May 19, 2014 Vol. 11, No.19

"It's better to have a rich soul than to be rich."
-- Olga Korbut

LET'S VISIT ONE OF OUR PROMISEFAMILIES!

Our readers often ask about the families of our 2,000 PromiseKids, so we decided to visit just one representative family, the Kowalski family (fictitious name).

The Kowalski PromiseFamily consists of 9 people including three of our PromiseKids from the Primary School in Oparzno, Kamila, Ewelina and Patrycia. Ewelina is a very talented dancer and has performed with our PromiseKids at our Annual Dinner Dance in Warsaw.

Mr. Kowalski died 2 years ago, and Mrs. Kowalski is unemployed. Older brother Lukasz (17) attends the Technical School in Swidwin where he is a very good student. He likes to play football, but suffers from a very serious skin condition which causes him to lose his hair. There are two older brothers who are incarcerated in Polish prisons, and present a major emotional drain on the Kowalski family. Sixteen-year-old Ania is institutionalized in a school for the mentally disabled, and the oldest sister, Sylwia (18), is a single mother and lives with her baby in Szczecin.

The family lives on Social Welfare, a small pension, donations from Caritas, and some seasonal work like gardening and picking strawberries. The mother can’t read or write and is considered socially disabled. The family lives in Oparzno village in a small house with two rooms, one bathroom, and a tiny kitchen. Their pride and joy is a very neat vegetable garden.

We have known the Kowalski family for a very long time. We’ve been supporting them with FCSR Staff support and with numerous gifts and supplies from our Foundation members, such as cleaning supplies, toys, clothes and shoes. Kamila, Ewelina and Patrycia take part in our Hot-Meal program at the Oparzno School, and participate in all of our other FCSR programs.

The Kowalski family really needs help, starting with a leaking roof and new furniture. They need a gas oven, refrigerator, and numerous inside renovations.

I trust the above description will give you an idea of how we use our Foundation’s donations. Remember the Kowalski family in your prayers.

YOU CAN DANCE IN THE PROMISELAND YOUTUBE LINK (CLICK BELOW)


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dNfMxmFhV58#t=1575

POLES ARE QUITTING SMOKING

The number of smokers has decreased from 12.5 million (38 percent of the entire population) in 1995 to 8.5 million (26 percent) in 2013, according to the 2013 Social Diagnosis survey. Poles consume some 46/6 billion cigarettes a year, which is 26 billion fewer than in 2006. Its not that Poles are quitting smoking, but the younger generations are less eager to pick up smoking in the first place, said Prof. Janusz Czapiński, the author of the survey.

COLGATE-PALMOLIVE DELIVERS PERSONAL HEALTH CARE PRODUCTS TO OUR PROMISLAND SCHOOLS AND RELEASES ITS 2013 SUSTAINABILITY REPORT

Colgate-Palmolive has released its 2013 Sustainability Report titled, Giving the World Reasons to Smile. This annual report details Colgate’s long-standing commitments, achievements and challenges to sustainability and social responsibility around the world. This year’s highlights include:

  • Colgate improved the sustainability profile in over 48 percent of new products and the balance of its portfolio in 2013 (based on representative products evaluated against comparable Colgate products).
  • Colgate’s flagship oral health education program, “Bright Smiles, Bright Futures,” has reached 750 million children in over 80 countries since 1991.
  • Hill’s Pet Nutrition donated pet food worth a retail value of more than $7.5 million to pet shelters in the United States in 2013, to date helping more than 7 million dogs and cats find their forever home.
  • Colgate reduced both energy use and carbon emissions per ton of production by over 16 percent compared to 2005 and was named a U.S. EPA ENERGY STAR Partner of the Year for the fourth year in a row, with recognition for Sustained Excellence.
  • Through Colgate’s partnership with Water for People, over 10,000 people in India and Guatemala now have access to clean water and sanitation systems. Colgate in turn delivered our “Bright Smiles, Bright Futures” and hand washing education programs in some of the schools that received clean water.
  • Colgate was also selected for CDP’s Climate Disclosure Leadership Indices, ranked as one of the World’s Most Ethical Companies by Ethisphere Institute and was again named to the Dow Jones World and North America Sustainability Leadership Indices.

Colgate’s recent commitments are also highlighted in the report:

  • Colgate announced a new commitment to reduce carbon emissions on an absolute basis by 25 percent compared to 2002, with a longer-term goal of a 50 percent reduction by 2050.
  • Colgate committed to mobilize resources to help achieve no deforestation in its supply chain by 2020, as detailed in a new Policy on No Deforestation.
  • The Company committed to improving the sustainability profile of its packaging – to increase the recycled content to 50 percent by 2020 and improve packaging recyclability.
  • As recently published in a new Policy on Ingredient Safety, Colgate has made commitments to eliminate formaldehyde donors, parabens, and microplastics from products over the next two years.

GIFTS IN KIND… ARE THEY FOR YOUR COMPANY?

In-kind giving is an underappreciated and underutilized form of corporate philanthropy -- a low-hanging fruit that too few companies bother to pluck. Aside from the obvious benefits to nonprofits, there are so many reasons for businesses to leverage the advantages of gifts in kind, from the impressive tax deductions that accompany these forms of giving - with even greater tax benefits for companies than donating cash - to the very real potential for increased employee engagement, recruitment and retention. But the payoff can be doubly huge for those business leaders imaginative enough to creatively tailor an in-kind giving program to the exact personality of their corporate brands.

Take, for example, Vans. Yes, that Vans, the shoe company we all grew up with, the hipster skateboard cool accessory that defines a certain kind of aesthetic and has been a fashion rite of passage for generations. The company began organically in 1966, from the simple idea of a checkerboard shoe, and kids ever since have been buying them so they could express themselves by both wearing and drawing on them as a kind of wearable canvas.

“Expression of youth culture and art has always been part of Vans brand,” notes Vans President Kevin Bailey. “Many of our employees have gone through arts education. Creative expression is at the core of the brand.”

So what could be more perfect for a youth culture brand than an in-kind giving program that draws on skills-based volunteering to support the arts in schools? And further, a program that mirrors the unique style of the brand and reverberates back to it in endless ways that grow the program while increasing brand awareness and loyalty?

Just like the company’s own beginnings, Vans’ in-kind giving program started in an organic way. In 2009, an art teacher in Colorado was looking to find new ways to engage his students and reached out to a friend for ideas. The friend happened to be a Vans sales rep who suggested donating a bunch of plain white Vans to use as canvases.

Thus was born Custom Culture. Within just one year, the program had grown into an art competition that included 200 high schools – inspiring kids to get creative and custom design Vans shoes to represent one of four focus areas: art, music, action sports or street culture.

“We launched the program from a standpoint of just embracing students and giving them a platform,” Bailey notes. “We just wanted to help them be creative. But then we saw that maybe we could bring more attention to funding and arts education. If we could do that, we wanted to try.”

It was a natural fit and a hit, embraced by schools, parents and kids. Now in its fifth year, Custom Culture has evolved to include 2,000 schools in 50 states and has contributed $100,000 toward public arts education. In addition to directly funding arts education through the contest, Custom Culture is raising awareness about the state of underfunding that exists in arts education today. With the Vans Brazil division joining for the first time this year, the program has even caught fire globally in ways that its original creator could never have imagined.

“We’re trying to use the platform we have to help elevate the conversation,” says Bailey. “Innovation and innovative leadership conversations are happening every day all over our world at companies in every industry. But if we don’t foster arts education, what happens to the right brain? To the creative side of leadership? That’s just as important as all of this focus on the business side of innovation.”

With the program currently limited at 2,000 entrants, school districts battle to qualify, and parents and kids work hard to lobby for votes and see their entries make it through to the final rounds.

While Custom Culture benefits kids and brings awareness to the widening gap in arts education funding, Vans is also creatively addressing one of the biggest dilemmas facing companies today: how to find, cultivate and retain innovative talent. It doesn’t hurt that, “Art has a way of forging deep personal relationships,” as Bailey notes.

But you don’t need to be a hip brand to engage your employees around corporate giving. Any company would be well served to find vehicles for employee engagement as perfect for its mission as Custom Culture is for Vans.

Vans employees help narrow the initial entrants down to a group of 50 semi-finalists, build out the showcase website, and act as photographers and videographers at contest events. As the five finalists are identified, they also volunteer as mentors, helping the students learn how to turn their ideas into commercially viable designs.

“The reality of Vans shoes is that everyone thinks of them as a way to express yourself,” says Bailey. “When our employees see what the kids create, it inspires them. Just being around these young people is inspiring. We’re a company that’s about youth culture, so to have the ability to engage with these kids, to display the shoes in the “kitchen” [the dining area where employees meet and eat] and have employees gather all day with them – it’s exciting.”

There are some serious “wow” factors built into Vans Custom Culture. But the biggest one is reserved for the final five contestants: Vans flies all of them to New York City for some unique hands-on arts education in one of the biggest art cities in the world. Last year, for example, a docent led finalists on a street art tour around the city, and then the students participated in creating a mural as a team. For the finishing touch, Vans arranged for a gallery display of all the art the team created together.

In keeping with the independent flavor of the Vans brand, winning schools can do whatever they want with the money, and the range of arts activities they choose to invest in is broad. From purchasing kilns for ceramics classes, to stocking visual arts classrooms with brushes and canvases, to funding music programs – wherever there’s a gap, Vans is helping schools meet that need.

Vans may be a well-known brand and a for-profit company. But its in-kind giving program is a powerful engine for the brand that benefits Vans as much as it does its recipients. Custom Culture is an inspiring example that other companies seeking to create an in-kind giving program which includes skills and values-based philanthropy can learn from.

HERE IS HOW YOU CAN HELP OUR PROMISEKIDS

Our Dollar a Day program may be just what you have been looking for and the PayPal method of delivering your money makes it so easy. We pay just about $1.00 to feed one hungry Polish child a hot-meal per school day, $20.00 per month, $200.00 per year. Click PayPal below to contribute.

DATES TO REMEMBER

June 27, 2014 - End of the school year.

July - August, 2014 - Sports camp for promiskieds sponsored by Ghelamco.

THOUGHT FOR THE WEEK

"Forgiveness does not change the past, but it does enlarge the future."

-- Paul Boese

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