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THE FOUNDATION FOR CORPORATE SOCIAL RESPONSIBILITY IS A NETWORK OF INTERNATIONAL CORPORATIONS ACTIVELY WORKING IN POLAND TO AFFECT POSITIVE SOCIAL CHANGE THROUGH CORPORATE PHILANTHROPY. WE FEED, EDUCATE AND EMPOWER POOR CHILDREN IN POLAND. COLLECTIVELY, WE HAVE FED OVER 6 MILLION HOT MEALS TO SOME OF POLAND’S MOST NEEDY CHILDREN. OUR MISSION IS TO LEAD THE BUSINESS COMMUNITY IN RAISING THE LEVEL AND QUALITY OF CORPORATE SOCIAL RESPONSIBILITY.

Newsletter February 23, 2015 Vol. 12, No. 7

"We must not, in trying to think about how we can make a big difference, ignore the small daily differences we can make which, over time, add up to big differences that we often cannot foresee."
-- Marian Wright Edelman, Child Advocate

SMALL DAILY DIFFERENCES

As you anticipate your Monday schedule, I thought the following “Glass of Milk” story might warm your hearts and help prove that Marian Wright Edelman was correct in saying that small daily differences add up to big differences that we often cannot foresee.

One day, a poor boy who was selling goods from door to door to pay his way through school, found he had only one thin dime left, and he was hungry.

He decided he would ask for a meal at the next house. However, he lost his nerve when a lovely young woman opened the door.

Instead of a meal he asked for a drink of water! She thought he looked hungry so brought him a large glass of milk. He drank it so slowly, and then asked, How much do I owe you?"

You don't owe me anything," she replied. "Mother has taught us never to accept pay for a kindness."

He said ... "Then I thank you from my heart."

As Howard Kelly left that house, he not only felt stronger physically, but his faith in God and man was stronger also. He had been ready to give up and quit.

Many years later that same young woman became critically ill. The local doctors were baffled. They finally sent her to the big city, where they called in specialists to study her rare disease.

Dr. Howard Kelly was called in for the consultation. When he heard the name of the town she came from, a strange light filled his eyes. Immediately he rose and went down the hall of the hospital to her room.

Dressed in his doctor's gown he went in to see her. He recognized her at once. He went back to the consultation room determined to do his best to save her life. From that day he gave special attention to her case.

After a long struggle, the battle was won.

Dr. Kelly requested the business office to pass the final bill to him for approval. He looked at it and then wrote something on the edge, and the bill was sent to her room. She feared to open it, for she was sure it would take the rest of her life to pay for it all. Finally she looked, and something caught her attention on the side of the bill. She read these words ...

"Paid in full with one glass of milk"

(Signed) Dr. Howard Kelly.

Tears of joy flooded her eyes as her happy heart prayed: "Thank You God that Your love has spread broad through human hearts and hands."

There's a saying which goes something like this: Bread cast on the waters comes back to you. The good deed you do today may benefit you or someone you love at the least expected time. If you never see the deed again at least you will have made the world a better place.

Marian Wright Edelman was right!

YOUNG POLES ARE NOT MOBILE

Almost 50 percent of Polish students continue to live with their parents and over 75 percent of people aged between 25 and 30 have never changed their place of residence, as reported in a survey by the Educational Research Insitute (IBE). According to the research, only 10 percent of future students apply to universities mainly in the same city or region where they live. High-school graduates choose nearby universities in order to reduce living costs, the surveyed showed.

Young Poles coming from small municipalities (up to 10,000 inhabitants) are more mobile than their peers from towns and cities. As much as 40 percent of them have changed their place of residence at least once. Among people from cities of over 100,000 inhabitants, the percentage is twice as low (17 percent.)

BEER WAS THE MOST POPULAR FOOD PRODUCT IN 2014

Poles spent as much as PLN 14.5 billion on beer in the period between December 2013and November 2014, according to a report by market research company Nielsen. Beer tops the ranking of the most popular food products, followed by vodka, with PLN 10.3 billion in sales. Beer and vodka are so popular in Poland, that it is hard to imagine that any other alcohol could beat the hegemony of these two drinks in terms of sales volume and value,Agata Andrzejczak from International Wine & Spirit Research wasquoted as saying by the Polish daily Rzeczpospolita. Although beer was the most popular food product, its sales value declined by 1.1 percent year-on-year, while vodka sales value increased by 2.4 percent y/y.

WARSAW ATTRACTED NEARLY 4 MILLION VISITORS LAST YEAR

The capital of Poland ranked 42nd in the Top City Destinations ranking, covering 100 of the world's leading cities in terms of international tourist arrivals, conducted by Euromonitor International, a market intelligence firm. Krakow is also included in the ranking, taking 70th place.

Warsaw was visited by nearly 4 million tourists last year, which is an increase of 8.9 percent year-on-year. Krakow attracted as many as 2.45 million visitors, an increase of 8.9 percent y/y. Hong Kong tops the ranking (25.6 million tourists), followed by Singapore (22.5 million visitors) and Bangkok (17.5 million tourists).

ÒLDA WINS BAFTA

Polish drama directed by Paweł Pawlikowski, titled ÒIda, won the British Academy of Film and Television Arts (BAFTA) award Sunday for the Best Foreign Language Film. The movie beat its competitors: Russia's Leviathan, India's The Lunchbox, Brazil's Trash and Belgian/French Two Days, One Night. ÒIda once won a BAFTA for the best newcomer, then one for the best British Film, and now for the best foreign film, so I think we should just skip the formalities and give me a lifetime global achievement award, Pawlikowski said jokingly during his acceptance speech. ÒIda also won the main Spanish film award, Goya, in the Best European Film category on Saturday. Set in the 1960s, ÒIda tells the story of a novice nun, who along with her aunt, a former prosecutor associated with the Stalinist regime, sets out on a journey to find the resting place of her parents killed during World War II. The movie won numerous prestigious Polish and European awards and is nominated for the Best Foreign Language Film at the 87th Academy Awards.

POLES WORK A LOT BUT NOT HARD ENOUGH - EUROSTAT

Polish employees are second-longest working in the EU (after Greeks) but their productivity needs an improvement, according to Eurostat. In 2013, the average working time in Poland was 41 hours per week, a 3.5 hours longer that the EU average time. However, in terms of productivity (GDP per hour worked), Poles turned out one of the lowest ranking nations. Only Lithuania, Latvia, Estonia, Bulgaria and Romania obtained worse results.

HERE IS HOW YOU CAN HELP OUR PROMISEKIDS

Our Dollar a Day program may be just what you have been looking for and the PayPal method of delivering your money makes it so easy. We pay just about $1.00 to feed one hungry Polish child a hot-meal per school day, $20.00 per month, $200.00 per year. Click PayPal below to contribute.

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